a "been-there" mom of six offers encouragement
to wives, young mothers, and those not so young,
and simple common-sense approaches to
the "ings" of life:
child-rearing (hints and helps), homemaking (all areas),
cooking (simple, cheap, and do-it-yourself)
making (toys and gifts), preparing (for the unexpected),
maintaining (sanity and peace in this increasingly crazy world) and more---
all aspects of making the most of making do on little---
and having fun in the process.

Thursday, October 13, 2011

#2 Give the Gift of Self . . . Not Stuff

More Coupon Ideas-----For Those Who Live Away

Give a gift that keeps on giving—in the form of personalized coupons.

An offer for a future service is usually most welcome, especially when they are away.
Those who are away will especially welcome periodic contact!

Recap: To get started just think of things you would appreciate if you were the recipient. Next, consider what you are willing to do, like to do or do well, and combine the two.

For those away, the coupons would be different but with a little thought, there are still a variety of options.

Someone Moving Away: A promise to write every week, month, etc for a set period of time. No matter how friendly new neighbors are, moving from an old neighborhood is hard and letters are a welcome "upper."

For a Member of the Military, Missionary, or College Student: Let your imagination, their situation, and your relationship with that individual be your guide. Coupons can be provided for any number of items---letters, cookies, photographs, phone calls, or even new socks. They could be sent periodically or the recipient could redeem their coupon when they wanted the item.

Grandparents (or other relatives) who live alone or a distance away: Again, a promise to write as above---every week, two weeks, or a month, etc. Maybe include a photo when you can. Write a postcard if that is all you have time to do. You could even use the photo as the postcard!   I know your free time short and hectic, and I also know in many cases, their free time is long and lonely.

Even in this day of electronic correspondence and the telephone, there is something very special about a letter. 

Even in this day with the speed of all the
electronic correspondence and the telephone, 
there is something very special about 
receiving a letter.
     Years ago there was a short film "The Mailbox." Often I can't remember something I saw or read yesterday but this film I have never forgotten.
     An elderly lady lived alone on a rural country road. It was quite a long walk to her mail box but she made the effort every day, only to be disappointed----day after day. Occasionally there was a bill but nothing else. Her mail carrier would apologize if he was delivering when she happened along.
     Her children called her faithfully every week but she said it just wasn't the same. A letter you could hold and see and read--and re-read when loneliness became too much in between the phone calls.
     Finally there was a letter. She clutched it as she excitedly, and gingerly, made her way back up the long rough driveway. She eased herself into the chair and opened it.                                                                                                                                                          

And fortunately, she passed on before she could read it. Her children had written to tell her they were would be there the next week----to move her to a nursing home.

Tomorrow will be the final post in this three part "series."

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